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NEW JAMAICAN SLANGS Featured

Entertainment News Written by  AKA Thursday, 12 August 2010 02:00 font size decrease font size increase font size 0
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Jamaicans are well-known for their ability to come up with a whole new vernacular to express themselves, and one constantly has to be 'in the streets' to hear what is new in terms of slang or one could be left feeling like a stranger in one's own country. Check out a list of new slang we have compiled for your ongoing 'street education'.

Yuseet – an abbreviation of the phrase ‘yu see it’

dawdie – substitute for friend, bredrin

Pawdie – pardner, bredrin, friend

Style yu a try style mi – to make an insulting remark, or diss in an indirect manner

Squaddie – officer

Govern the ting – control or execute an action

Fully govern - slang that comes from Erup

Ah Gaza mi say  - show of support for the Gaza

Ah Gully mi say – show of support for the Gully

Bankrobber – a type of shoes

Dem a try bait me up – used in reference to someone trying to set you up

Mi like it – slang originated from deejay Baby Chris which expresses  approval

Bill   - to wait, and is believed to be derived from the word, ‘build’ which is known to take some time. Often used in the sentence, ‘The dads say fi bill’

The ting tun up – things are improving, getting better

Full rev – full blast

Mi nuh know wah dem de pon, mi know wah mi de pon

Weh dem feel like?

Sulphur head - hothead

Hotskull - hothead

Loo – term which refers to an action that escapes reasoning; a silly stupid move. Used in sentences like ‘yu a live inna loo’

Mi neva sign up fi dis – which means that you don’t approve of an action

Mi nuh know wah yu de pon, but mi know wah mi de pon – phrase that asserts that you are on a different path from someone else.

Bankrobber – a type of Clarks shoe

Ahoe – slang that means agreement

Ah mi fi tell yu – just  a colourful slang to reaffirm what you just said.

Wire dem – overwhelm dem by sheer force of will or numbers

Crawb up – means that something is happening, or fantastic

Maamie – term for women

chargie - term that means the same as dawdie or pawdie

Crush the road – hit the streets


OD – means to overdo

Baz - well dressed, abbreviation of "bazzle"

Oh! - a term of agreement

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